Month: October 2013

Stages of Grief at Work

Much has been written about Elisabeth Kübler-Ross’ five stages of grief:  denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. I am thinking about this, because a family member is currently dealing with cancer.  He spent some time in denial (delayed seeing a doctor).  He spent months bargaining (if I become a vegan, this will go away).  I

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How to Take a Break

CaveGirlMBA’s post about the guy who plays online games at work really struck a chord with me, because here’s a second post about it.  For me, the story is explained by one of two possibilities. 1.   He is thoroughly disengaged and doesn’t give a s**t 2.   He is engaged, but takes breaks inappropriately You’ll know

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Stepping into a Pile of Management

My boss told me that the only difference between management and non-management is that managers get to hire and fire (so you’d better get good at it). Truth be told, she said this during a somewhat negative performance review. That’s a blunt way of saying non-managers are responsible for tasks while managers are responsible for people. 

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We Don’t Need No %@# Standards?*

Imagine comparing two school districts’ test scores, where each district uses different tests.  That would be meaningless, right? Yet, this situation exists on the business side of things. Legislation will require a calculation, but the implementation is unclear.  Subsequent guidelines and regulations (if any) sometimes just cite the statute verbatim. For example, prior to the new funding formula, conversion

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Fun Civics Facts

When my non-American family members ask what I do for a living, I first have to explain what a school district is. I have discovered that many Americans don’t really know what a school district is either.  And a few of those actually work at school districts.  The most common surprise seems to be that

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Eleven Important Rules for Reporting

When you are asked to report results internally or externally, there are several rules of thumb that, if followed, will usually make life a lot easier for you.  Otherwise, you may overshare, share wrong data, or actually not answer the real question being asked.  This is especially important when dealing with reporters and public information requests.

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